Saturday, November 05, 2011

(NEWZIMBABWE) PM: Country risks political implosion

COMMENT - We have been here before. (Read: Makone absolves Zanu PF in Harare violence) The MDC is manipulating Zimbabwe's image for political gain. They should NEVER be allowed to govern freely, or there will be a civil war. The MDC cannot win in a general election, so they are resorting to inviting economic sanctions, possibly a military invasion by a foreign army. This is who the MDC are - they are traitors.

PM: Country risks political implosion
04/11/2011 00:00:00
by Agencies

SECURITY agents loyal to President Robert Mugabe are behind a ''coup'' that is plunging the country back into political violence, Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai has claimed.

Tsvangirai, speaking this week after police sealed the offices of his Movement for Democratic Change party, firing tear-gas into the building and at bystanders in Harare, said: ''It appears the demons of violence are back - a siege mood seems to be slowly gripping the country.

''The state security agents have instituted a coup over the civilian authority and they are now above the law, to the extent of disrupting government programs and assaulting civilians with impunity.''

Incidents of political violence decreased after Mugabe and Tsvangirai formed a unity government following disputed elections in 2008, during which more than 200 people died, but talk of a poll next year has reignited tension.

Tsvangirai remains critical of the President for clinging to power, but describes the relationship in their weekly meetings as cordial.

However, tensions appear to be escalating as parties begin campaigns for elections expected early next year and in recent weeks police have disrupted Tsvangirai's rallies in the western Matabeleland region, where the MDC won the majority of parliamentary seats in 2008.

Last Saturday, ZANU-PF militants disrupted an MDC rally organised by a minister jointly responsible for police affairs.

Tsvangirai said: ''The violence we are witnessing is state-sponsored and state-driven. It is being championed by a few fascist leaders who want to reverse the little progress we have made.

''The country is at a high risk of imploding if some in the leadership continue to be privately abetting lawlessness while publicly preaching non-violence.''

Tsvangirai said Mugabe had assured him during a meeting on Tuesday the issue of violence would be dealt with.

In a speech to parliament in September, Mugabe called for an end to violence.

While he was speaking, militants attacked MDC activists outside. ZANU-PF denies engaging in violence and accuses MDC supporters of provoking its supporters.

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10 Comments:

At 7:52 PM , Blogger MrK said...

From the Mail & Guardian (South Africa), AFP:

Mugabe supporters stone Tsvangirai's rally
HARARE, ZIMBABWE - Nov 06 2011 17:38

Young supporters of Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe stoned and beat backers of Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai on Sunday, blocking a planned rally of his Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party.

"Unfortunately we are unable to do this rally because of incredible acts of wanton violence, malicious violence that we have suffered at the hands of Zanu-PF this morning," Tendai Biti, MDC secretary general, told a news conference.

Zanu-PF is Mugabe's political party.

The rally, which Tsvangirai was due to address, was slated to be held in the sprawling Harare suburb of Chitungwiza, 30km south-east of the capital.

Biti said seven MDC activists were admitted to hospital, while five party vehicles were damaged.

"There are literally hundreds of people that have been beaten up, that have been stoned by Zanu-PF supporters, They have suffered bruises, tissue injuries, various degrees of injuries", he said.

He said police failed to protect the MDC.

"They watched us as these Zanu-PF youths destroyed our property and assaulted our members," he said.

Police were not immediately available for comment.

A chaos scenario

Biti, who is also Zimbabwe's finance minister in the power-sharing government between Mugabe and Tsvangirai, accused Zanu-PF of using violence to provoke fear in the run-up to elections expected to be held as soon as next year.

"It is self-evident that Zanu-PF is already building up to the next election. It is quite clear that we are in a chaos scenario where they are unleashing violence," he said.

"We will remain committed to non-violence despite provocation."

Zimbabwe's unity government has been riven by problems since it was formed in February 2009, after a bitterly disputed first round 2008 vote where neither candidate won an absolute majority.

That election sparked a wave of attacks where more than 200 MDC supporters were killed. Tsvangirai pulled out of the second round against Mugabe to end the violence.

The power-sharing pact was meant to introduce security sector reforms that would prevent a repeat of the violence, but Tsvangirai has accused Mugabe of failing to uphold his end of the deal.

-- AFP

 
At 7:13 PM , Blogger MrK said...

MDC-T banned cops from rally: Mugabe
Violence ... Riot police move in to stop the clashes
07/11/2011 00:00:00
by Staff Reporter

POLICE were unable to act to prevent the violence that forced MDC-T leader Morgan Tsvangirai to call off a planned weekend rally because they had been banned from the event, President Robert Mugabe said on Monday.

The MDC-T claims police details “stood-by and watched” as dozens of its supporters were attacked and property damaged when Zanu PF activists stormed a football ground in Chitungwiza where Tsvangirai was set to hold a rally on Sunday.

"They (police) watched us as these Zanu PF youths destroyed our property and assaulted our members," MDC-T secretary general Tendai Biti said after the disturbances.

Tsvangirai confronted Mugabe at their weekly meeting on Monday, but the Zanu PF leader said the MDC-T had contributed to the problems by insisting that it did not want police at its gatherings.

“The President intimated to him (PM Tsvangirai) that the Police Commissioner-General (Augustine Chihuri) was not at the venue of the clashes and had not deployed in Chitungwiza because the MDC-T made it clear to the police that they were not welcome to their meetings as the MDC-T was able to police itself,” Mugabe’s spokesman George Charamba told state media.

"(The) Prime Minister (was told) that the Police Commissioner-General can only deploy where he is wanted and where an incident has happened, the Commissioner-General will move in on the strength of the law. That was made clear to the Prime Minister."

Despite Mugabe’s reluctance to blame the police for failing to bring the violence under control, he and Tsvangirai agreed to call a meeting of the Zanu PF central committee and the national executive committees of the two MDC factions on Friday where leaders of the three parties will speak out against violence."

“We have now agreed that on Friday we are going to convene a meeting of Central Committee and national executive councils of the three parties to discuss the issue of political violence,” Tsvangirai told reporters on Monday.

He, however, warned that the violence could undermine preparations for elections expected to be held early next year.
A date for the poll is set to be agreed once the ongoing constitutional reforms are completed.

“We will come up with a date but of course with conditions for credible elections... if the current situation prevails then the elections will be a sham," Tsvangirai said.

 
At 6:19 AM , Blogger MrK said...

Hunt for violence sponsors hots up
Thursday, 10 November 2011 00:00
Zvamaida Murwira and Lloyd Gumbo

JOMIC and the Organ on National Healing, Integration and Reconciliation yesterday met representatives of parties in the inclusive Government and chiefs ahead of tomorrow's indaba on violence. While acknowledging the police probe into recent cases of violence, Jomic said it was launching its own investigations to establish the forces behind the skirmishes.

Those fingered in the probe will be prosecuted. Zanu-PF secretary for administration Cde Didymus Mutasa, who is co-ordinating tomorrow's high-level indaba, said preparations for the meeting were going on well. He said preliminary meetings were held yesterday.

"We are meeting again tomorrow (today) as co-ordinators and secretaries general of other parties in preparation for the meeting," said Cde Mutasa.

Jomic co-chairpersons Cde Patrick Chinamasa (Zanu-PF), Mrs Priscilla Misihairabwi-Mushonga (MDC) and Mr Elton Mangoma (MDC-T) said they were going to meet Police Commissioner-General Augustine Chihuri over the issue.

Jomic chairperson for November Mrs Misihairabwi Mushonga said a Jomic committee yesterday met provincial chairmen for Harare from the three political parties.
They met Cde Amos Midzi (Zanu-PF), Mr Paul Madzore (MDC-T) and Mr Trynos Muguchini (MDC).

Mr Madzore confirmed the meeting, but said it was just an interface by the provincial leadership.

"Violence is of concern to everyone, so as the chairpersons of the parties we are going to meet again tomorrow morning (today).

"After we have done our investigations, we will notify the police of our findings and also to find out what would have happened to the perpetrators," she said.

"As Jomic, we do not tolerate violence and we would want political parties' leadership to cascade the message of peace down to the grassroots. We would want the political leadership to always take responsibility in stopping this violence."

Cde Chinamasa said it was critical to establish the underlying causes of violence.

He said the meeting with the police top brass would ensure perpetrators of violence are brought to book.

Cde Chinamasa said it was the responsibility of the police to investigate and prosecute all perpetrators of violence.

"As Jomic, we can't prevent violence and we expect the police to be in the lead in investigating and bringing to book all the perpetrators.

"That is the reason why the police should always be informed of meetings so that they can have their people at the possible flash points because we believe what is important is to prevent violence," he said.

Cde Chinamasa said the meeting with the police will afford them a chance to present their side of the story.

He said the objective was to create an environment for free and fair elections.
Cde Chinamasa said the legitimacy of any election outcome where there is violence would be disputed.

He said Jomic was in the process of establishing district committees to monitor political parties and their supporters.

Cde Chinamasa said the committees would be best suited to impartially advise the Jomic leadership of the causes of violence.

He said Jomic had found funding to finance districts and provincial operations.

Mr Mangoma said there was need for the political leadership to walk the talk on preaching peace.

"We want to see commitment from leadership and what they say in public should be consistent with what they say in private.

"If we let this violence continue, it will consume this nation overnight and as Jomic we will do our part in making sure that there is peace and tranquillity in the country. We cannot develop as a country if there is violence.

 
At 6:19 AM , Blogger MrK said...

(Continued...) "Jomic will carry out its own investigations and everyone knows that a fair game has to be done and the facts will come out and those behind it will have to be prosecuted," he said.

Mr Mangoma said Jomic's goal was to build peace and tolerance through dialogue.
Mr Mangoma hailed parties in the inclusive Government for coming together to promote peace.

He said tomorrow's high-level meeting will be a landmark move in the fight against political violence.

During the Organ on National Healing, Integration and Reconciliation's meeting with traditional leaders, it was agreed that chiefs were best placed to deal with political violence in their localities.

Vice President John Nkomo who chairs the organ said from their interaction with various stakeholders in the past months, traditional leaders were the right people to deal with the vice.

Chiefs' Council president Fortune Charumbira concurred with VP Nkomo, but implored the three political parties to invite traditional leaders to tomorrow's indaba as observers.

The Vice President chronicled the country's political history and the struggle for independence, adding there was no need for brothers to fight each other.

He said the fight should have ended with the war against imperialists.

VP Nkomo said a council will be established from national to district level to deal with political violence.

A code of conduct will be prepared for political parties that should guide them, said the VP.

Chief Charumbira said when political violence occurs, traditional leaders are hurt most.

Some traditional leaders were given an opportunity to give their views on the matter.

 
At 5:50 PM , Blogger MrK said...

(NEWZIMBABWE, REUTERS) Mugabe, Tsvangirai, Ncube condemn political violence
Calling for peace ... Tsvangirai, Mugabe and Ncube attend Friday's meeting
11/11/2011 00:00:00
by MacDonald Dzirutwe I Reuters

ZIMBABWE'S three main political leaders stood together on Friday to condemn political violence, and said parties should freely hold meetings at a time when tensions are rising ahead of possible elections in 2012.

Last week, MDC-T president Morgan Tsvangirai said violence was on the increase and Zanu PF leader Robert Mugabe's supporters and state security agents were to blame.

On Friday Mugabe, Tsvangirai and Welshman Ncube, who leads a faction of the MDC, addressed a joint meeting of senior members of their respective parties and said "endemic" political violence had to end ahead of the next elections, likely to be both parliamentary and presidential.

Zimbabwe's votes over the last decade were marred by political violence, largely blamed on militant supporters of Mugabe's Zanu PF party.

"We have committed heart and soul that we ensure that our country is without violence. We want to live in a peaceful country," Mugabe said.

The 87-year-old leader said he had been discussing the issue with Tsvangirai during weekly meetings, adding that parties should set up inter-party committees across the country to stop violence.

Tsvangirai and Mugabe said their relationship had changed from one of hostility to one of friendly opposition and urged party supporters to emulate this.
"Let us differ with dignity. Violence is a collective national shame," Tsvangirai said at the same meeting.

Talk of a possible election next year has reignited violence, which had decreased after Zanu PF and the two MDC factions formed a unity government more than two years ago following a disputed election in 2008.

Under the agreement, Mugabe stayed on as President while Tsvangirai became Prime Minister. Ncube is the Industry and Commerce Minister.

Police have in the past few weeks disrupted Tsvangirai's rallies in the western Matabeleland region where his MDC-T won the majority of parliamentary seats in 2008.

Suspected Zanu PF militants last Sunday forced Tsvangirai to cancel a rally when they attacked MDC-T youths in Chitungwiza town outside Harare.
Mugabe said he was sincere in calling for an end to violence and parties should not force people to attend rallies.

He also said the police should protect all citizens, noting that there were complaints some officers stand by when Zanu PF members attack Tsvangirai's supporters.

"Let us walk the talk of peace. This is our sincere plea from our hearts," Mugabe said.

"People must hold their meetings freely. Don't stand in the way of those who are holding a meeting."
The parties also agreed on a code of conduct against political violence.

Mugabe has ruled Zimbabwe since independence from Britain in 1980 and critics say the veteran leader has clung to power by using violence against opponents and through coercion and patronage to retain support within Zanu PF.

He is Zanu PF's presidential candidate in the next vote.

 
At 6:30 PM , Blogger MrK said...

Mugabe, Tsvangirai, Ncube condemn political violence
Calling for peace ... Tsvangirai, Mugabe and Ncube attend Friday's meeting
11/11/2011 00:00:00
by MacDonald Dzirutwe I Reuters

ZIMBABWE'S three main political leaders stood together on Friday to condemn political violence, and said parties should freely hold meetings at a time when tensions are rising ahead of possible elections in 2012.

Last week, MDC-T president Morgan Tsvangirai said violence was on the increase and Zanu PF leader Robert Mugabe's supporters and state security agents were to blame.

On Friday Mugabe, Tsvangirai and Welshman Ncube, who leads a faction of the MDC, addressed a joint meeting of senior members of their respective parties and said "endemic" political violence had to end ahead of the next elections, likely to be both parliamentary and presidential.

Zimbabwe's votes over the last decade were marred by political violence, largely blamed on militant supporters of Mugabe's Zanu PF party.

"We have committed heart and soul that we ensure that our country is without violence. We want to live in a peaceful country," Mugabe said.

The 87-year-old leader said he had been discussing the issue with Tsvangirai during weekly meetings, adding that parties should set up inter-party committees across the country to stop violence.

Tsvangirai and Mugabe said their relationship had changed from one of hostility to one of friendly opposition and urged party supporters to emulate this.
"Let us differ with dignity. Violence is a collective national shame," Tsvangirai said at the same meeting.

Talk of a possible election next year has reignited violence, which had decreased after Zanu PF and the two MDC factions formed a unity government more than two years ago following a disputed election in 2008.

Under the agreement, Mugabe stayed on as President while Tsvangirai became Prime Minister. Ncube is the Industry and Commerce Minister.

Police have in the past few weeks disrupted Tsvangirai's rallies in the western Matabeleland region where his MDC-T won the majority of parliamentary seats in 2008.

Suspected Zanu PF militants last Sunday forced Tsvangirai to cancel a rally when they attacked MDC-T youths in Chitungwiza town outside Harare.
Mugabe said he was sincere in calling for an end to violence and parties should not force people to attend rallies.

He also said the police should protect all citizens, noting that there were complaints some officers stand by when Zanu PF members attack Tsvangirai's supporters.

"Let us walk the talk of peace. This is our sincere plea from our hearts," Mugabe said.

"People must hold their meetings freely. Don't stand in the way of those who are holding a meeting."
The parties also agreed on a code of conduct against political violence.

Mugabe has ruled Zimbabwe since independence from Britain in 1980 and critics say the veteran leader has clung to power by using violence against opponents and through coercion and patronage to retain support within Zanu PF.
He is Zanu PF's presidential candidate in the next vote.

 
At 6:39 PM , Blogger MrK said...

Just a note for correction - "Mugabe has ruled Zimbabwe since independence from Britain in 1980". Rhodesia broke away from Britain and declared itself independent in 1965 as Rhodesia. 1980 marked the end of white minority rule, not independence from Britain.

Zimbabwe's votes over the last decade were marred by political violence, largely blamed on militant supporters of Mugabe's Zanu PF party.

'Largely blamed (on ZANU-PF)' by whom? There has always been plenty of MDC violence, not the least economic violence of economic sanctions, which has killed tens of thousands of Zimbabweans.

The 87-year-old leader said

Why do reporters working for Reuters, the BBC, CNN, etc. always mention President Mugabe's age? And for what purpose? Do they mention Morgan Tsvangirai's age? Or health?

There is a not so fine line between reporting and propaganda, and the so-called mainstream media is always eager to be on the propaganda side, when diamonds or oil are at stake.

 
At 6:13 PM , Blogger MrK said...

(HERALD) Code of conduct for parties
Monday, 14 November 2011 00:00

Lovemore Chikova Deputy News Editor
POLITICAL parties causing violence will be held accountable following the drafting of a Code of Conduct by the Organ on National Healing, Reconciliation and Integration.

The code compels political parties to publicly campaign against violence.

It will establish a National Peace and Reconciliation Council to resolve political disputes.

Organ on National Healing, Reconciliation and Integration co-chair Senator Sekai Holland said they were seeking ways to ensure punitive measures are part of the Code of Conduct.

"The draft Code of Conduct is already being discussed by all political parties and we want to synthesise what the political parties are saying," she said.

"People are asking us the same question on how we will make the Code of Conduct effective. It will be voluntary to start with. But it will have a punitive mechanism for enforcement and possibly instilling discipline.

"The document is now with various stakeholders who will study it and recommend how we can enforce it to ensure there is peace in the country.

"The data from stakeholders helped us to produce a policy document based on views of Zimbabweans to develop a culture of peace," she said.

President Mugabe and MDC-T leader Mr Morgan Tsvangirai last week said the Code of Conduct will be used to reign in perpetrators of violence. They said this while addressing Zanu-PF, MDC-T and

MDC executives at a meeting to seek ways to end political violence.

Zanu-PF secretary for administration Cde Didymus Mutasa said the party's Politburo discussed the document at its last meeting.

"As a party we were happy with the document. However, it is not about the paper alone, but how people behave as we go to the elections. It is about how people submit themselves to what is written in that paper."

ALSO SEE

* Violence: Parties take action
* Mutambara faction ejected from indaba
* MDC-T: Dreams of death, division and invasion

 
At 6:14 PM , Blogger MrK said...

(Continued...) Cde Mutasa said political parties' acceptance of the Code of Conduct was important.

MDC organising secretary Mr Qubani Moyo said they were yet to receive the document.

"We have heard about it, but I think it is still work in progress because it is yet to be finalised," he said.

The Code of Conduct says leaders of political parties will be compelled to issue directives forbidding the intimidation of opponents.

"The leader of a party that has subscribed to this code will instruct the party's officials, candidates, members and supporters that no weapon of any kind, including any traditional weapon, may be brought to any political rally, meeting, march or other demonstration," reads the Code of Conduct.

"A party that has subscribed to this code will not engage in or permit any kind of violent activity to demonstrate party strength or to prove supremacy."

Inter-party and stakeholders committees will be established at national, provincial and district levels to deal with political violence.

The Code of Conduct calls for political parties to manage their election campaigns in ways that do not infringe on the activities of others.

It emphasises that political parties should be able to campaign and disseminate their political ideas without fear.
It touches on conduct of political parties during polling, accepting the outcome of a free and fair election, the use of right language during campaignc and that parties should not imitate symbols of others.

"A party that has subscribed to this code accepts that intimidation in any form is unacceptable," reads the Code of Conduct.

"A party that has subscribed to this code will not use official State, provincial, municipal or other public resources for campaign purposes."

The Code of Conduct compels political parties to desist from bribery to garner votes.

 
At 4:56 PM , Blogger MrK said...

Back from the 2008 election, but worth remembering.

Isn't strange, that someone in the MDC (again) is declared dead, that he was supposed to have been gruesomely tortured which is explained in great detail, and then is found alive in South Africa?


MDC ACTIVITS GIFT NHIDZA DECLARED DEAD BY SW RADIO AFRICA AND CANVAS - FOUND ALIVE IN SOUTH AFRICA BY SLATE.

Tortured MDC activist dies from injuries
By Lance Guma
10 November 2009

Tortured MDC activist dies from injuries
Written by Jelena
Thursday, 19 November 2009 13:21

And He's Back From the Dead...


How South Africa became the world's No. 1 asylum destination.
By Maura R. O'Connor|Posted Friday, Aug. 27, 2010, at 12:55 PM ET
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa—

Givemore Gift Nhidza is not dead.

Over the last year, several newspapers have reported that Nhidza, a political activist in Zimbabwe's Movement for Democratic Change opposition party, is dead. But he is alive, and like 3 million other Zimbabweans, he is living in South Africa until the day he can return home without fear of being killed or going hungry.

******

Of course, there are no 3 million Zimbabweans in South Africa... Etc., etc. - MrK

 

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